Thursday, July 2, 2009

General Electric: Merchant of Death

There are a lot of people in the world who oppose the use of animals in medical testing. While most of us aren't too tenderhearted when it comes to such research being done on rats, there are still those who wish such research might be done in such a way that animals aren't involved.

Still, the idea of ending research on animals and doing it on people, instead, is abhorrent. Even when those people are very, very small:
Although ethical debates about the use of embryonic stem cells continue to rage, stem cell technology is beginning to make its way into the medical marketplace. Yesterday, General Electric division GE Healthcare announced that it’s teaming up with the biotechnology company Geron in a venture that will use embryonic stem cells to develop products that could give drug developers an early warning of whether new medicines are toxic [Reuters].

The agreement marks the first time that a company of GE’s stature and size has announced a business venture involving the controversial field of embryonic stem cells. That could reflect a more tolerant climate for the technology in the wake of the Obama administration’s recent relaxation of restrictions on embryonic stem-cell research [The Wall Street Journal]. Supporters of embryonic stem cell research say the work will lead to a host of treatments for cancer and other diseases, while opponents believe that the destruction of any human embryo is unacceptable.

See, Professor Kmiec? When you eagerly shake the hands of the merchants of death while proclaiming that your own pro-life views need not trouble them, no sir, not at all, then these are the kinds of things we find happening. When little bottles of Embry-cure are being sold over the counter for people to take to combat fatigue, nausea, depression, and hair loss (all things produced by long association with pro-abort Democrats, by the way), will you suffer the slightest pang of conscience at the thought of your role, pitifully insignificant though it was, in helping get elected the man who made ESCR a fun and profitable activity?

As for General Electric--well, I've bought my last GE product. I see no reason to purchase appliances and other trinkets from a company busily figuring out how to make lampshades out of embryonic skin--or how to test drugs on batches of livers and kidneys cannibalized from innocent embryonic life. Such evil should be treated with all the contempt it deserves; people of good will should, quite literally, have nothing whatsoever to do with those responsible for it. Except, of course, in fervent prayer for their immediate conversion.

8 comments:

Lindsay said...

Wow. I can't believe it. This makes me think of Swift's "Indecent Proposal." I'll bet he never thought his satire would be prophetic. I mean, surely its ridiculous to turn Irish babies into a commodity, right??!! Terrifying.

Lindsay said...

Just checking back to clarify that I thought you were intentionally referencing An Indecent Proposal with the lampshade comment...

LarryD said...

I'm linking to this, Erin. Interesting, isn't it, that this is announced a week or so after Obama dismissed the US Council on Bioethics?

John Thayer Jensen said...

Swift's proposal was "A Modest Proposal..." (much longer actual title - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_modest_proposal). It would have been indecent had it been serious, of course, but it was, as you say, satire.

Lindsay said...

Yes, of course. Thank you. Must have needed some caffeine when I wrote that. Funny how words come out since I've had children. God must know how much I need humbling.

eulogos said...

I think the allusion to lampshades is to something the Nazi's did with Jewish skin.
Susan

Lindsay said...

I see. Not sure I want to know any more detail than that.

This was the passage from Swift's aptly titled essay:) that I thought of when reading Erin's reference to lampshades, "Those who are more thrifty (as I must confess the times require) may flay the carcass; the skin of which artificially dressed will make admirable gloves for ladies, and summer boots for fine gentlemen."

Which, if you've never read it, is referencing what to do with the carcasses of one year old Irish babies after they've been eaten.

axbic said...

You said it: I have purchased my last GE product.

Ironic; I think one of their logos used to be "GE, we bring good things to life." Now they can say, "GE, we bring death to Good Things."