Thursday, April 29, 2010

A post full of links

Once again, it's Thursday, choir practice day, and I'm out of time to blog; I've got to start making dinner in a few minutes.

So I'll just share a few of the things I "collected" this week, in no particular order:

1. The pope asked bloggers to give the Internet a soul. Tragically, several top Catholic bloggers thought the pontiff said to give the Internet "soul," not "a soul," and immediately translated all their posts into jive. And if you don't get that joke, you're a lot younger than I am. :)

2. Following the nasty attack on the Holy Father by idiot wunderbrats at Great Britain's Foreign Office, UK Telegraph blogger Damian Thompson asks, "Well, really, were you surprised?" Given that thanks to the British education system nearly one in five Brits thinks that "haggis" is a wild creature that roams the hills of Scotland, well, no, I'm not, actually.

3. Christmas in April? LarryD has the scoop: British madness apparently doesn't end with pope-bashing and haggis-sightings. It's just too inconvenient for some, apparently, to have to deal with church-stuff at Christmas--why, people have better things to do at Christmas than go to church, especially if those things involve bashing the pope, consuming large quantities of inebriating beverages in the company of family and friends, and trying to outdo Americans in terms of trite consumerism.

4. While the Arizona immigration law is worthy of intelligent discussion, and while I hope to do some at least quasi-intelligent discussing of it myself in the coming days, the MSM proves that even on a serious issue like immigration it's possible for them to be unbelievable idiotic, as this tv newsflash headline proclaiming "Arizona Law 'Makes it a Crime to be Illegal Immigrant'" illustrates amply.

5. Finally, while lots of people have written about the terrific new Oklahoma law requiring women to have ultrasounds and hear a description of the baby's development, I was amused at this AP article's quote from the "Center for Reproductive Rights," as follows: "The New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights has said it is one of the strictest anti-abortion measures in the country." This law doesn't stop a single woman from having a single abortion, but it's one of the "strictest" pro-life laws because women have to look at the living, moving child inside them before signing off on the contract to kill?

That's it for today!

5 comments:

Lindsay said...

Oddly, my husband can actually recite the entire jive-talk scene from Airplane.

LarryD said...

Thank you for the link, Erin. You are too kind!

opey124 said...

But I liked the play on words....give internet soul...

Siarlys Jenkins said...

I would submit that the operative word is "some people." To say "British people are like this..." is not unlike saying "All Danes must die for the sins of that blasphemous cartoonist." There is of course a considerable difference between lampooning on line and murder by riotous mobs... but the mass characterization is a bit off. Think of all the many things that could be said about Americans: we are overcommercialized, ascetic, traditionalist, fundamentalist, freethinkers, Papists, Amish, jingoists, pacifists...

Siarlys Jenkins said...

I have to add a brief note on the Oklahoma law. I would amend it in one respect. The ultrasound shown to the pregnant woman should be at accurate size, with no magnification. If the embryo or fetus is half an inch long, no big blown-up images. If its three inches long, six inches long, ten inches long, so be it. I suspect the impact will vary, but whatever the woman decides, its her decision. It should make a significant difference by twenty weeks, and for some women, much earlier. So be it.