Thursday, December 22, 2011

You know it's almost Christmas...

...when a blogger writes a post about why she wears the veil to Mass, and another blogger links to and expands on that post, and as of this writing, neither post has attracted the humdrum hundred comments such posts generally attract.

This, despite the fact that the first post was posted on Dec. 15.

And that it was linked to on New Advent.

My thoughts on the wearing of a veil are well known, of course, but I wanted to give those of my readers who aren't swamped in last-minute preparations for the upcoming Holy Day a chance to visit these blogs if they like. Or talk about veils here, if you want. I'm winding things down here, and will probably put up the last pre-Christmas post Friday and then take roughly a week off (give or take), but I will try to check in on comments periodically.

3 comments:

Dymphna said...

I wear a veil at Mass. It's something I need to do. If anyone has an issue with it I figure that it's their problem not mine. A few women at Mass used glare at me, others are friendly. I say nothing to the woman in pajama bottoms at Mass and she politely ignores my veil. I don't want to fight about something that is so precious and personal. Truce.

Deirdre Mundy said...

I was just reading Ronald Knox's Enthusiasm, and came across and interesting tidbit on veils and Paul and Corinthians.

There's a theolry that the Corinthians were having a rash of 'prophetesses' speaking in tongues, having ecstasies, falling and shaking, etc. etc. (Apparently Corinth had always been into that sort of things) and the veils for women were big and long and hid the person from view. So the whole thing about not praying unless veiled may have been a way of giving the Corinthian women a choice: i.e. : If this is actually from God, do it behind your veil where no one can see you and you won't get attention, otherwise, don't do it.

If Knox's interpretation is correct, then the question to ask would be: does your head covering make you the center of attention, or is it easily overlooked?

Tony said...

If Knox's interpretation is correct, then the question to ask would be: does your head covering make you the center of attention, or is it easily overlooked?

I don't think it really matters. The decision to wear the veil is deeply personal. If you have any concerns whatsoever about how you will be perceived by others (positively or negatively) I believe you're wearing the veil for the wrong reason.

I applaud a woman who wears a veil at Mass, especially the ordinary form where the vast majority of women (sometimes every other woman) is not wearing a veil.

And I'm not ashamed to say that seeing a veiled woman helps me orient myself toward God. Much like the priest's attitude while serving the Mass does the same thing.